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Range Rover colours and price guide

With its upmarket image, luxuriously-appointed cabin and impressive levels of comfort, the Range Rover is an ideal choice if you’re in the market for a high-end SUV.

It’s also a pretty versatile car when it comes to tailoring to your desired spec, as there are lots of engines, wheelbase length and trim levels for you to choose from. Even the paint options list is vast – no less than 31 different colours are available on the Range Rover. Check out our comprehensive colour and price guide below, so you can pick out the perfect finish for your new Range Rover.

Byron Blue – No-cost option

Of the blue hues you can spec on the Range Rover, the misty Byron Blue is by far the lightest. That relative brightness is complemented by the metallic finish, which gives the colour a premium-feeling sheen in daylight. However, it is one of the trickier Range Rover colours to keep looking spotless. Most Range Rover versions are available in Byron Blue, though you can’t spec it on the Range Rover Fifty edition or either of the SVAutobiography Dynamic models.

Eiger Grey – No-cost option

It isn’t the most exciting colour you can have your Range Rover painted in, but Eiger Grey is nevertheless a smart metallic colour to have on the car. Plus, it’s also a paint that won’t scare away any buyers on the second-hand market. The only models that aren’t available in Eiger Grey are the SVAutobiography Dynamic Black Edition and Range Rover Fifty versions.

Firenze Red – No-cost option

Firenze Red is a vibrant red that, while perhaps a bit off-putting to some used buyers, will certainly appeal to prospective Range Rover owners who want an attention-grabbing colour. As the paint isn’t too bright, it shouldn’t be too hard to keep looking clean, either. While it’s a no-cost option colour, you can only have a Range Rover in Firenze Red on the sporty SVAutobiography Dynamic model.

Fuji White – No-cost option

One of the simplest colour options on the Range Rover is Fuji White – it’s the only solid paint you can spec on the opulent 4×4. The solid finish means Fuji White can look a bit flat in comparison with an equivalent metallic or pearlescent colour, though it’s still a paint that suits the Range Rover well. Do bear in mind, though, that white paints need lots of regular cleaning to keep looking spotless. The only trims Fuji White isn’t available on are the Range Rover Fifty and SVAutobiography Dynamic Black specs.

Portofino Blue – No-cost option

In comparison with the earlier Byron Blue colour, Portofino Blue has a noticeably darker tone, which means it’ll be more appealing to buyers after a more subtle colour for their Range Rover. That more muted tone means it should also be fairly good at hiding dirt – unless, that is, you make the most of the car’s off-road ability on a muddy trail. You can’t spec Portofino Blue on the SVAutobiography Dynamic trims or the Range Rover Fifty edition, though it’s available on all the other versions.

Rossello Red – No-cost option

Whereas Firenze Red was a vibrant red, Rossello Red is more akin to a deep and rich crimson colour. As with Portofino Blue, that means it’s a classy colour that’s ideal if you’re after a smart-looking yet unconventional paint to spec on your Land Rover. Rossello Red doesn’t come on the Westminster or SVAutobiography Dynamic versions of the Range Rover, though you can have this paint on the other Range Rover variants.

Santorini Black – No-cost option

If you’re umming and ahhing over which colour to spec on your Range Rover, then it may be worth going for Santorini Black. It may be a no-cost option colour, but the metallic finish gives this paint an appropriately classy sheen. Plus, it’s a colour that suits the Range Rover well and works nicely with the car’s shinier exterior trim pieces. Santorini Black is also the only colour that you can specify on all versions of the Range Rover.

Yulong White – No-cost option

Yulong White isn’t as bright a colour as Fuji White, though it’s still a colour that works well on the luxury SUV. Yulong White also has the benefit over Fuji White of being a metallic colour, which means it has a premium-feeling sheen under bright lights that’s accentuated a bit further by the paint’s subtle silver hue. It’s not a widely available colour, though – you can only spec Yulong White on the Vogue, Vogue SE, Autobiography and SVAutobiography versions of the Range Rover.

Aruba – £865 (no-cost option on SVAutobiography trim)

Aruba is a gold colour, which sounds on paper like a really ostentatious paint to pick for a Range Rover. However, because it’s very pale gold, Aruba works surprisingly well on this big and luxurious SUV. That light tone means, like the Range Rover’s white colour options, Aruba won’t be the paint for you if you want something that can hide dirt well. Aruba is available on most Range Rover trims, apart from the Westminster and SVAutoboiography Dynamic specs.

Carpathian Grey – £865 (no-cost option on SVAutobiography trim)

Because it’s a dark grey, Carpathian Grey is worth considering if you want a dark neutral colour for your Range Rover that’s easier to keep looking clean than black paint. Because it’s such a dark colour, it suits the classy look of the Range Rover, too. You can spec Carpathian Grey on all versions of the Range Rover, apart from the SVAutobiography Dynamic and SVAutobiography Dynamic Black trims.

Silicon Silver – £865 (no-cost option on SVAutobiography trim)

Silicon Silver is a lot lighter than Carpathian Grey, so it’ll need more regular washes in comparison to keep looking factory fresh. If that isn’t a dealbreaker for you, then Silicon Silver is a decent choice, as it’s a smart-looking colour that should also have lots of appeal on the second-hand market. Silicon Silver isn’t available on the Range Rover Fifty or the two SVAutobiography Dynamic trims, though you can spec it on the other remaining versions.

Balmoral Blue – £4,590 (£7,140 for satin finish)

Balmoral Blue is where the colours on this list start getting expensive – even the standard colour has a price tag befitting this paint’s regal name. However, if you can afford it, Balmoral Blue is a deep and dark blue that, thanks to the glossy finish, gives the car an appropriately opulent look. If your budget stretches enough, you can even spec it with a satin matte coating. The only Range Rover trims you can’t spec Balmoral Blue on are Range Rover Fifty and SVAutobiography Dynamic Black Edition.

Borealis Black – £4,590 (£7,140 for satin finish)

On a screen, Borealis Black doesn’t look that much different to the Santorini Black colour featured earlier in this list. You’ll be able to tell them apart out on the road, though, as Borealis Black has a bit more depth to it thanks to the multi-coloured flakes in the paintwork. That fancy finish won’t stop Borealis Black from being a dirt magnet, though. Borealis Black is available on most Range Rover trims – the only ones it isn’t offered on are the Range Rover Fifty and (unusually, perhaps) SVAutobiography Dynamic Black Edition specs.

Bosphorus Grey – £4,590 (£7,140 for satin finish)

One of the four greys available on the Range Rover, Bosphorus Grey distinguishes itself by not being a typical dark grey. Instead, it spices things up by having a sparkly finish and a slight dark blue hue in the paintwork. The end result is, as with many of the Range Rover’s darker tones, a classy colour that gives the car an understated look. You can’t spec Bosphorus Grey on the Range Rover Fifty and SVAutobiography Dynamic Black Edition versions)

British Racing Green – £4,590 (£7,140 for satin finish)

British Racing Green isn’t a colour you’d perhaps expect to see offered on a large and luxurious SUV, but that’s what Land Rover has decided to do. This also isn’t a simple dark green, either, as it’s been jazzed up with what Land Rover calls a “contemporary sparkling” metallic finish – which should mean it’ll have a very premium-feeling look under bright lights. The Range Rover Fifty and SVAutobiography Dynamic Black Edition trims are the only versions that aren’t available with this colour.

Desire – £4,590 (£7,140 for satin finish)

By far the deepest red you can spec on the Range Rover is the shade you see here called Desire. A Range Rover in this colour won’t perhaps be to everyone’s tastes, though this tone should be dark enough to win over some potential buyers come resale time. As it’s such a dark colour, it’ll also hide dirt marks well. Desire can’t be specified on the Range Rover Fifty and SVAutobiography Dynamic Black Edition trims.

Ethereal – £4,590 (£7,140 for satin finish)

Ethereal is one of the frostiest silver colours you can spec on the Range Rover – so much so, in fact, that it can look more like a white paint in certain light conditions. That means it’ll be a colour that’s tricky to keep clean, though it also makes Ethereal an uncontroversial colour that suits the Range Rover’s styling cues. Like the last few colours on this list, you can’t have a Range Rover in Ethereal if you go for the Range Rover Fifty and SVAutobiography Dynamic Black Edition versions.

Flux – £4,590 (£7,140 for satin finish)

At face value, Flux may look like any old metallic silver paint. However, as the colour’s high price suggests, there’s more to it than that. Making up the metallic flakes are thin pieces of aluminium, which help add more depth to the paintwork – especially on a bright sunny day. That fancy finish doesn’t stop Flux from being just as susceptible to looking really dirty after a long drive as most other silvers, though. Flux is available on most Range Rover models, apart from the Range Rover Fifty and SVAutobiography Dynamic Black Edition specs.

Ligurian Black – £4,590 (£7,140 for satin finish)

Like all of the Range Rover’s black paint options, Ligurian Black is a classy colour that will appeal to anyone looking to buy your car second hand. It’s also a pretty fancy paint, as it comes with a special pigment that gives off green and blue hues, depending on the light conditions. However, that fancy look will be spoiled somewhat if your Range Rover isn’t regularly given a good scrub. Ligurian Black isn’t offered on the Range Rover Fifty and SVAutobiography Dynamic Black Edition versions.

Madagascar Orange – £4,590 (£7,140 for satin finish)

If you want the brightest possible colour on your Range Rover, then Madagascar Orange will probably be the paint for you. Making this already striking shade even more eye-catching is the paint’s colour-changing pigment, which can transform the Orange into yellows and reds in specific lighting scenarios. Such vivid paint won’t be for everyone, though, and it’ll also be tricky to keep looking clean. Madagascar Orange is offered on most Range Rover versions, other than the Range Rover Fifty and SVAutobiography Dynamic Black Edition cars.

Mescalito Black – £4,590 (£7,140 for satin finish)

Like many of the Range Rover’s pricey paint options, Mescalito Black isn’t your typical colour – catch it in the right light, and you’ll spot a hint of a very deep red in its glossy finish. Mescalito Black also follows in the footsteps of the Range Rover’s other dark paint options, in that it’s an understated colour that suits the car well. Being a black paint, though, it does a poor job at hiding dirt deposits on the bodywork. Mescalito Black can’t be specified on Range Rover Fifty and SVAutobiography Dynamic Black Edition models.

Rio Gold – £4,590 (£7,140 for satin finish)

Rio Gold is a colour that sounds on paper that it’ll be a bit garish. However, the end result is a calm, almost creamy colour with a mild rose gold hue. This makes Rio Gold an interesting alternative if you’d prefer something a bit different to a white paint finish. Do bear in mind, though, that this colour will need to be cleaned regularly to stay in factory fresh shape, as it won’t hide road grime well at all. Rio Gold is available on most Range Rover variants, with the exception of the Range Rover Fifty and SVAutobiography Dynamic Black Edition models.

Scafell Grey – £4,590 (£7,140 for satin finish)

Being a dark grey, Scafell Grey is (as is the case with most of the Range Rover’s paint options) a neutral colour that doesn’t rock the boat, yet also is a good fit for the Range Rover’s upmarket image. Making it stand out from the other grey paint options is the subtle colour change element to this colour, which brings out an ever-so-mild plummy hue, depending on the light conditions. As it’s a dark grey, this paint should also appeal to used buyers, and won’t be too hard to keep looking factory fresh. The only trims Scafell Grey isn’t available on are the Range Rover Fifty and SVAutobiography Dynamic Black Edition specs.

Velocity – £4,590 (£7,140 for satin finish)

Unlike many of the other pricey paint options on the Range Rover, Velocity doesn’t attract attention with a fancy colour-changing pigment. Instead, it’s a head-turner purely because of its vivid tone and bright metallic finish. As a result, a Range Rover in this colour likely won’t be particularly easy to sell on the used market, though it’ll be perfect for anyone after a colour that’ll stand out in a crowded car park. The Range Rover Fifty and SVAutobiography Dynamic Black Edition trims are the only versions that aren’t available in Velocity Blue.

Verbier Silver – £4,590 (£7,140 for satin finish)

Of the many greys and silvers available on the Range Rover, Verbier Silver is one of the brightest. It’s particularly shiny under bright lights, as the metallic flakes in the paintwork have been designed to bring out what Land Rover describes as an “intense” sparkle. As with all shiny silver car paints, Verbier Silver is a bit of a high maintenance colour, as it’ll need lots of scrubbing to keep looking spotless.

Windward Grey – £4,590 (£7,140 for satin finish)

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Windward Grey is a very dark grey paint, which makes it a colour worth considering (if your budget allows it) for buyers after a neutral and smart-looking colour that will also be easy to sell on. It’ll also be a more dazzling colour under bright lights, as Windward Grey has a more intense shine in comparison with the Range Rover’s regular metallic paint options. As it’s a darker colour, it shouldn’t also need regular washes to keep looking clean. Windward Grey can’t be specified on Range Rover Fifty and SVAutobiography Dynamic Black Edition models.

Meribel White – £6,240 (£8,790 for satin finish)

In comparison with the Range Rover’s more conventional metallic white options, Meribel White doesn’t look that different on the screen. However, it’ll be easier to tell them apart under natural light, as Meribel White has a glossier and more intense metallic finish. Like all white paints, it’ll show up dirt very easily, so it’ll require lots of washes if you want to keep the colour spotless. Meribel White is available on most Range Rover trims, though you can spec it on Range Rover Fifty and SVAutobiography Dynamic Black Edition cars.

Spectral Blue – £6,240 (£8,790 for satin finish)

As its name implies, Spectral Blue doesn’t cover just one shade of blue, but a multitude of colours across that spectrum. Thanks to the fancy colour-shifting element in its pigment, the hue can change from purple to turquoise and even dark green, depending on the light conditions. That may put off some new and used buyers after a more conventional colour, but Spectral Blue does claw back some ground by being a fairly understated hue that also won’t need much scrubbing to keep looking good. Spectral Blue isn’t offered on Range Rover Fifty and SVAutobiography Dynamic Black Edition versions of the Range Rover.

Spectral British Racing Green – £6,240 (£8,790 for satin finish)

If the ‘standard’ British Racing Green colour wasn’t distinct enough for you, then this special effect alternative may fit the bill. Like the regular colour, it’s a darker colour with a premium-feeling metallic finish – though, thanks to the colour-shift element, it can also show a hint of teal if you catch it in the right light. Do bear in mind this may make an already unconventional colour a bit too out there for some if you’re hoping for an easy sale on the used market. Spectral British Racing Green is available on all Range Rover versions, other than the Range Rover Fifty and SVAutobiography Dynamic Black Edition models.

Spectral Racing Red – £6,240 (£8,790 for satin finish)

Much like some of the Range Rover’s other flashy paint options, Spectral Racing Red has a colour shift element to its finish. This means it can look different depending on the light conditions – ranging from a deep and intense red, to having a much brighter and vivid hue. A colour like this may not be the easiest to sell on the used market, though there’s no denying it makes the Range Rover stand out in traffic. Spectral Racing Red isn’t available on Range Rover Fifty and SVAutobiography Dynamic Black Edition cars.

Valloire White – £6,240 (£8,790 for satin finish)

Valloire White isn’t too drastically different to the Meribel White colour – after all, it’s a glossy pearlescent white paint. The only real distance is that there’s a mild warm hue to the colour you see here. Because of the slim differences, Valloire White should be a colour that will suit the Range Rover as well as it’s difficult to keep looking pristine and dirt-free. This paint option isn’t available on Range Rover Fifty and SVAutobiography Dynamic Black Edition models.