Audi TTS Interior

RRP from
£41,205
Seats
4
Boot (seats up)
305 litres
Boot (seats down)
712 litres

The Audi TTS comes with a very smart cabin that’s packed with tech. The only real criticism you can level at it is that it looks very similar to the old model inside…

Style

The Audi TTS’s cabin looks and feels even more special than what you get in a BMW M2. Every surface you regularly touch comes with a soft plastic, plush leather or brushed aluminium finish and there aren’t any hard brittle plastics low down on the doors.

The five metal air vents on the dashboard look very smart and they come with built-in screens for the standard climate control. As a result, there aren’t any ugly buttons and dials cluttering up the Audi TTS’s dashboard or centre console like in the Mercedes SLC – just a single row of neat rocker switches for the likes of the drive mode select and hazard-warning lights.

Another neat feature that contributes to the TTS’s minimalist cabin design is the high-resolution digital driver’s display (called the Virtual Cockpit) that you get as standard. This customisable screen replaces conventional analogue dials and makes driving the Audi TTS feel ever so slightly like piloting a futuristic fighter jet.

Also standard in the Audi TTS are a set of supportive front seats with leather and Alcantara upholstery and a flat-bottomed steering wheel – just like what you get in the R8 supercar – with some bright red contrasting stitching and a TTS badge.

It’s a case of ‘less is more’ with the Audi TTS interior. This car has one of the simplest and most stylish cabins of any compact sports car on sale

Mat Watson
carwow expert
Infotainment

Instead of an infotainment screen mounted on the dashboard, the Audi TTS comes as standard with a 12.3-inch digital driver’s display that replaces conventional analogue dials in front of the steering wheel. You can customise this screen to show a selection of readouts, including a TTS-specific mode that features a large central rev counter – just like even faster TTRS models.

You control this display using dedicated buttons on the steering wheel or the rotary dial down on the centre console. There’s also a selection of helpful shortcut buttons behind the gear lever to help make it a doddle to skip from one key feature to another – such as from the sat nav to the main menu. This helps make it much easier to use than the Mercedes SLC’s infotainment system but it still can’t quite match the super-intuitive iDrive setup you get in the BMW M2.

Unlike the previous TTS, this latest model comes with Audi’s technology pack as standard which includes sat nav, a wireless phone charger and a 10GB hard drive. Inputting an address into the sat nav is easy, whether you use the voice recognition feature or on-screen keyboard, and it delivers clear, concise directions overlayed on gorgeous high-resolution Google Maps.

If you aren’t keen on the Audi TTS’s built-in sat nav, you can beam your phone’s navigation apps directly onto the Audi’s infotainment screen using the standard Apple CarPlay and Android Auto smartphone mirroring features instead. Also standard is a wireless charging pad – to keep your phone brimmed with juice – and the Audi Phonebox feature that uses the Audi TTS’s built-in aerial to boost your phone’s signal. Now there’s no excuse for avoiding that awkward phone call from the boss on your way home…

The smartphone mirroring features also let you play music from streaming apps such as Spotify through the Audi’s stereo – a nine-speaker system with plenty of punch to fill the TTS’s small cabin. If you fancy a more bass-heavy soundtrack, you should consider a TTS Black Edition – these come with a more powerful Bang & Olufsen system with 12 speakers and a noise cancelling system that helps muffle annoying wind and tyre noise at motorway speed.