Jaguar XF Sportbrake Review & Prices

The Jaguar XF Sportbrake looks great inside and out and now has an improved touchscreen infotainment system. There are bigger boots on offer if that matters most, though

Buy or lease the Jaguar XF Sportbrake at a price you’ll love
We take the hassle and haggle out of car buying by finding you great deals from local and national dealers
RRP £40,825 - £49,505
Carwow price from
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£615*
Used
£31,950
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wowscore
7/10
Reviewed by Carwow after extensive testing of the vehicle.

What's good

  • Great to look at inside and out
  • Decent touchscreen infotainment
  • High quality interior

What's not so good

  • Some rivals have bigger boots
  • Inefficient petrol versions
  • Road noise with larger wheels

Find out more about the Jaguar XF Sportbrake

Is the Jaguar XF Sportbrake a good car?

The Jaguar XF Sportbrake is a stylish estate car with great infotainment and that’s superb to drive, too. It should be on your list if you’re also considering posh estates like the Audi A6 Avant, BMW 5 Series Touring or Mercedes E-Class Estate.

However, it’s an alternative to posh SUVs too, like Jaguar’s own F-Pace, Audi’s Q5, BMW’s X3 or Mercedes’ GLC.

Imagine striding into a room full of ripped jeans wearing black tie and that’s what the Sportbrake is like next to its alternatives in the looks department. Its striking grille, air intakes, slim headlights and bonnet creases give it a sporty look, but it’s somehow a classier effort than from those across the water.

The Sportbrake’s insides never used to be much cop, but a mid-life update has changed things. Sure, there’s still the odd bit of cheaper plastic about the place, but it’s mostly very nice. An A6 and 5 Series are a tad nicer still, but it’s now a very close-run thing.

Part of the visual drama is the Sportbrake’s new 11.4-inch curved touchscreen. It’s located nicely on the dash to help when driving and make it integrate seamlessly into the sleek design. BMW’s iDrive and Mercedes’ MBUX systems are both easier to use while driving, but as touchscreen’s go, Jag’s effort is sharp, responsive and very easy to navigate. Importantly, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are both standard.

Cars higher up the range also come with slick digital driver’s dials and a rearview mirror you can flip from a standard glass reflection to a camera mounted on the tailgate. It looks cool, but also works well, so is more than just ammunition to impress your mates down the pub. It’s a shame the XF’s steering wheel buttons are a tad fiddly to use, though.

We know petrol is fashionable at the moment, but honestly, diesel could be a better option for many people, and R-Dynamic SE trim has all you need and more

All estate cars this size seat four adults well, but you’ll have slightly more room for three adults across the rear seats in an A6 Avant. There are also bigger boots, which could be quite important when researching estates. The XF’s actually pretty much matches the efforts of Audi and BMW, but Mercedes offers a decent amount more space and a more practical shape with its E-Class estate if you need it.

You can have your XF fitted with either a 2.0-litre turbo petrol with 250 or 300hp, or a 2.0 mild hybrid diesel with 204hp. You can also have rear or all-wheel drive depending on your choice, but an eight-speed automatic gearbox is standard across the range.

If you don’t cover many miles each year, or do most of your driving in town, then the smooth, quiet yet punchy petrols will do the job. Just don’t expect them to be fuel efficient whichever road you drive them on. We’re talking mid-30s, max.

The diesel with its mild hybrid technology is a much better bet for the majority of buyers. It’s quiet for a four-cylinder diesel and feels decently quick thanks to its hybrid tech assisting at low revs, while those doing big motorway miles will like that it uses less fuel than the petrols. 40mpg is possible without much fuss, and more is achievable on the motorway.

Thankfully, if you enjoy driving, then the Sportbrake remains one of the best cars with a big boot to chuck down a country road. It steers with precision, it keeps its body tidy through bends and it’s comfortable over bumps in and out of town. Only some tyre noise from the larger alloy wheel options frustrates on the motorway.

Nevertheless, the Jaguar XF is as good as it’s ever been to drive and sit in, and now to own, too, because Jaguar has simplified the XF range and dropped prices across the range. To see just how much, and how much we can save you on top, head to our Jaguar XF Sportbrake deals page and our current used Jaguar listings.

How much is the Jaguar XF Sportbrake?

The Jaguar XF Sportbrake has a RRP range of £40,825 to £49,505. Monthly payments start at £615. The price of a used Jaguar XF Sportbrake on Carwow starts at £31,950.

There are three “R-Dynamic” trim levels to choose from, all priced competitively against the equivalent Mercedes-Benz, Audi or BMW models.

The R-Dynamic S gets a self-dimming rear view mirror, while 18-inch alloy wheels look suitably purposeful. Heated power-folding door mirrors also feature, as do an 11.4-inch Pivi Pro infotainment screen and analogue dials with central TFT display in the cluster. Cruise control and lane-keep assist make every motorway journey pass with little stress.

Move up to R-Dynamic SE and you'll get larger 19-inch alloy wheels, plus keyless entry, an electrically adjustable steering column and 16-way electrically adjustable leather sports seats. The driver will stare at an interactive display, and at the end of your trip the car can tell you when it's safe to get out.

Heated electrically adjustable door mirrors and 20-inch alloy wheels get things off to a decent start with the R-Dynamic HSE, as do the 16-way electrically adjustable leather front seats with memory function. The latest Pivi Pro infotainment also features, along with an online data plan and a Meridian audio system. A 3D surround-view camera and parking sensors will help to keep your bumpers un-scuffed, and a driver monitor stops you getting too tired.

Performance and drive comfort

Grace, space and pace – the XF Sportbrake has typical Jaguar agility but can feel a bit firm in an urban environment

In town

The XF can feel a bit firm around town but is relaxing and comfortable to sit in, with good visibility for such a large car. Adding bigger alloy wheels makes the ride firmer still and can pick up on potholes and drain covers, affecting low speed ride.

That said, the automatic transmission is super-smooth and a joy to use.

On the motorway

At high speeds the XF is comfortable on both standard suspension and the optional adaptive set-up, known as Adaptive Dynamics. This is available on all models and gives you access to different drive modes, adding great stability at motorway speeds.

Wind noise is kept in check quite nicely, though cars with 20-inch alloys do tend to pick up a fair bit of surface noise.

On a twisty road

This is where the XF really comes into its own. Despite being a large car, the Jaguar handles with the agility and sharpness of a much smaller model, something Jaguar has always got just right.

The handling is helped by the standard-fit torque vectoring system, which helps the car to turn in even more willingly by gently braking the inside wheels in tight corners, in tandem with fantastic steering feedback.

On versions with adaptive suspension, engaging Dynamic mode tightens the handling up even more – if you’re a full-on driving enthusiast it’s a car that won’t disappoint!

Space and practicality

Spacious, luxurious and well-finished, there’s a lot to like about being inside a Jaguar XF, and in Sportbrake form it’s even more practical, though some alternatives have larger boots

It’s very easy to get comfortable in an XF, with heated 12-way, electrically adjustable front seats offered across the range and with up to three memory settings. The driving position is impeccable and there are a reasonable number of useful cubbies.

Head, shoulder and legroom are among the best in class, while ahead of the gear selector there is a small shelf and an optional wireless charging pad. Under the central armrest is a cubby big enough to accept larger items and also home to a USB, USB-C and 12V socket.

Space in the back seats

Unlike Jaguars of old, the XF has loads of rear legroom and two six-foot adults can sit side-by-side in complete comfort.

However, shoulder room isn’t as good as some rivals and is way behind the Audi A6. There are two ISOFIX mounts and getting a child seat in and out is easy thanks to wide door access.

Boot space

Although more practical than the XF saloon, in terms of boot space the Sportbrake’s 565 litres lags behind the Mercedes E-Class Estate’s 640 litres in particular, while the BMW 5 Series Touring offers five litres more than the Jaguar. That said, the XF’s 40/20/40 split-folding rear seats lie completely flat when folded down giving a highly practical load bay. The maximum luggage capacity is 1,700 litres.

Interior style, infotainment and accessories

The XF’s interior used to be dull and dowdy but the most recent update has changed things considerably.

Part of the visual appeal is its new 11.4-inch curved touchscreen. It’s located smartly on the dash to help while driving and make it integrate seamlessly into the sleek design, with fairly intuitive user-friendliness. Importantly, Apple CarPlay and Android Auto are both standard.

Cars higher up the range also come with slick digital dials and a rear-view mirror you can flip from a standard glass reflection to a camera mounted on the tailgate, which is handy of the boot is loaded to the gills. It looks cool, but also works well, so is more than just ammunition for bar room bragging rights.

The seats themselves are wonderful and the quality easily as good as any German rival – indeed, the XF Sportbrake is a car you can be proud to own and feel quite lavish about.

MPG, emissions and tax

If you don’t cover many miles each year, or do most of your driving in town, then the smooth, quiet yet punchy petrols will do the job. Just don’t expect amazing fuel economy whichever road you drive them on. Nevertheless, the 2.0-litre unit’s 250bhp is punchy enough, with 0-60 in 6.4 seconds.

The diesel with its mild-hybrid technology is a much better bet for the majority of buyers. It’s quiet for a four-cylinder diesel and feels decently quick thanks to its hybrid tech assisting at low revs, while those doing big motorway miles will like that it uses less fuel than the petrols. 40mpg is possible without much fuss, and more is achievable on the motorway. For company drivers, lower BIK and great economy make it the obvious choice.

Safety and security

The XF scored five stars (out of a possible five) for safety when it was crash tested by Euro NCAP and it has a comprehensive suite of advanced safety systems, including all-round cameras, lane keeping assist, traffic jam assist, traffic sign recognition and AEB.

It also gets dynamic road sign display tech and a driver alert system with fatigue detection.

Reliability and problems

The XF comes with a three-year, unlimited mileage warranty as standard. There have been no recalls as yet of the current model. 

Buy or lease the Jaguar XF Sportbrake at a price you’ll love
We take the hassle and haggle out of car buying by finding you great deals from local and national dealers
RRP £40,825 - £49,505
Carwow price from
Monthly
£615*
Used
£31,950
Ready to see prices tailored to you?
Compare new offers Compare used deals