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Toyota Supra Review

The Toyota Supra has a strong heritage and in its latest form is great fun to drive and well equipped. If you want the fastest lap times, though, there are better alternatives.

9/10
Wowscore

This score is awarded by our team of expert reviewers after extensive testing of the car

What's good

  • Strong performance
  • Comfy over bumps
  • Infotainment system

What's not so good

  • Alternatives are quicker in corners
  • Available in small numbers
  • No Android Auto

What do you want to read about Toyota Supra?

Overall verdict

The Toyota Supra has a strong heritage and in its latest form is great fun to drive and well equipped. If you want the fastest lap times, though, there are better alternatives.

The Toyota Supra is a bit like Angela Merkel slipping into a kimono with the help of Arnold Schwarzenegger. Confused? To explain, this fifth-generation model is designed in Japan, but underneath has lots of parts from BMW’s Z4. Oh, and it’s also built in Austria.

It might be a Z4 underneath, but it’s more likely you’ll also be in the market for solid-roofed sports cars such as the Porsche 718 Cayman, Audi TT and Alpine A110.

The Toyota Supra has a long heritage which is reflected in its design – its long bonnet, two seats and double-bubble roof are reminiscent of its 2000GT from the late 1960s. Then there’s that spoiler flick at the back which harks back to the famous fourth generation Supra of the 1990s.

Inside, Toyota says it has taken inspiration from single-seat race cars, but we’re not so convinced. For starters, there are two seats, and at no point do you feel like Lewis Hamilton in his F1 car. However, the driver-focused cabin with its tightly grouped controls do make it feel like a proper sports car.

And, because Toyota has borrowed lots of the Supra’s innards from BMW, everything looks and feels high-quality too. The switches and air vents are sturdy and there are soft-touch plastics in abundance, while the Supra also gets BMW’s fantastic iDrive infotainment system – even if it is a last-generation version.

Even so, built-in sat-nav comes as standard as well as DAB radio, Bluetooth and Apple CarPlay for mirroring your Apple smartphone. There’s no Android Auto for Android users, though, and this infotainment system’s logical menus and easy-to-programme sat-nav means you won’t be yearning to mirror your phone like you do in some alternatives.

There’s more than a whiff of BMW about the place, but to be honest, who wouldn’t want BMW’s engines and infotainment?

Mat Watson
carwow expert

The Supra’s cabin is spacious for two people, while its standard sports seats are supportive and the driver is treated to loads of seat and steering wheel adjustment – although even in its lowest setting some might feel that the driving position is a little higher than they’d like. At 290 litres the Supra’s boot isn’t huge and has an awkwardly narrow opening, but you can extend it a little further but removing a panel at the back.

The Toyota Supra comes with just one engine choice, BMW’s 3.0-litre, six-cylinder turbocharged petrol which produces 340hp. Rear-wheel drive and an eight-speed automatic gearbox come as standard helping it get from 0-60mph in 4.2 seconds, although you’ll also enjoy the way it pulls hard from low revs for sprinting down motorway slip roads and overtaking.

In fact, on country roads, the Supra is easily fast enough to excite, and putting it in its Sport driving mode adds more weight to the steering, livens up the accelerator and gearbox and opens a flap in its exhaust for more pops and bangs. It grips hard and controls its body well through tight bends, but if getting the quickest lap time is most important to you, then a Porsche Cayman will be quicker still.

Yet, switching back to Normal driving mode in town reveals the Supra to be the slightly more comfortable choice over lumps and bumps. It’s easy to see out of too, and its light but precise steering and decent turning circle make it easy to park – its standard front and rear sensors and rear camera help here too. It’s also decently comfy and quiet on the motorway.

So, the Supra won’t satisfy those after the ultimate track day car, but its superb engine makes it big fun to drive nevertheless. It’s also very well equipped, and comes with Toyota’s generous five-year warranty. The biggest problem? The first 300 have sold out and you’ll have to join a long waiting list for the next batch.