Honda Civic Type R new vs old compared

Honda’s new Civic Type R prototype took to the stage at the 2016 Paris Motor Show but how does this all new car compare to the outgoing model? We’ve taken an in-depth look at them both side-by-side to find out.

Before this new Type R goes on sale, many dealers will be keen to offer big discounts on the outgoing car. View these great current Honda Civic Type R deals using our configurator or, if you’re not sure what to buy, check out our new car deals page and car chooser tool.

Honda Civic Type R old vs new – styling

Even in the world of racy looking hot hatches, the current Civic Type R took spoilers, exhausts and gratuitous red trim pieces to a whole new level. It’s one of the most outrageous looking cars on the road and, although its outlandish appearance will be a little too boy racer for many, its shamelessly sporty styling proved popular with many buyers.

The new car follows firmly in its father’s footsteps. The latest generation Civic’s slightly reshaped body has grown and sprouted numerous wings, fins and intakes – few people will mistake this raucous Type R model for a run-of-the-mill Japanese hatchback.

The new car’s roof is flatter than before and the rear windscreen more steeply raked. Combine this with a giant rear wing and you’ll be lucky to see anything out of the rear-view mirror. The new pointy nose features slimmer, more aggressive headlights while the deep front splitter boasts a familiar stripe painted in the same bold red as the Type R badge.

It’s worth remembering this prototype may change slightly before the new car goes on sale in 2017. We don’t expect it to be altered drastically, however, but items such as the triple exhaust tips and ultra-low ride height may be lost in favour of more production-friendly features.

No images have been released, but the new car’s interior will be inspired by the current Type R’s, shown here…

Honda Civic Type R old vs new – interior

No images of the new car’s interior have been released, but we expect the new Type R to look significantly more sporty than the standard Civic’s cabin. A host of red details and a new steering wheel should appear when the car goes on sale in 2017. A supportive pair of sports seats – complete with bright red upholstery – are also expected to be fitted as standard.

Thanks to the new car’s slightly larger dimensions, its boot space and rear passenger head and legroom could be slightly improved. The current standard Civic is offered with cinema-style folding rear seats – the new model, and its Type R sibling, will not be offered with this feature, however.

Honda Civic Type R old vs new – driving and engines

No official details have been released but the new model is expected to come fitted with an upgraded version of the current car’s turbocharged 2.0-litre unit. This four-cylinder engine produces 306hp in its current form but a number of mechanical tweaks should help it close the gap to the likes of the more powerful 345hp Ford Focus RS and 380hp Mercedes A45 AMG.

Honda Civic Type R old vs new – prices and release date

Honda hasn’t confirmed how much the Civic Type R will cost but, when it goes on sale in 2017, we expect it to cost marginally more than the current model to reflect its slightly greater power output. Entry-level versions will cost in the region of £30,000 while models with more standard equipment could set you back approximately £33,000.

Save money on your new Honda Civic Type R

Many dealers will be keen to clear space in their showrooms ahead of the new model’s launch and could offer significant discounts on the current car. Check out these great deals using our Honda Civic Type R configurator. If you’re not sure what to buy, read our list of the best hot hatches currently on sale or check out our deals page and car chooser tool.

Honda Civic

Family hatchback with big boot and decent interior
6.9
£18,565 - £24,765
RRP
Read review Compare offers

Honda Civic Type R

Fast hatchback has big power, a big boot and gives big smiles
8.6
£30,000 - £32,300
RRP
Read review Compare offers
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