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Vauxhall Crossland review

The Vauxhall Crossland has great engine options, decent boot space and practical sliding rear seats on some models. It’s average to drive, though, and alternatives offer swankier infotainment options. 

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wowscore
7/10
This score is awarded by our team of
expert reviewers
With nearly 60 years of experience between them, carwow’s expert reviewers thoroughly test every car on sale on carwow, and so are perfectly placed to present you the facts and help you make that exciting decision
after extensive testing of the car

What's good

  • Efficient engine options
  • Easy-to-use infotainment
  • Decent boot space

What's not so good

  • Lack of digital dials option
  • Not much fun to drive...
  • ...nor that comfortable over bumps

Vauxhall Crossland: what would you like to read next?

Is the Vauxhall Crossland a good car?

The Vauxhall Crossland is a small SUV that has a range of efficient engines, bold colour options and practical sliding rear seats. These days there’s a simply staggering choice of cars like the Crossland, including the Peugeot 2008, VW T-Cross, Skoda Kamiq and SEAT Arona to name just a few.

Now, if you’re suffering from a case of déjà vu, fear not, because the Crossland was formerly called the Crossland X. And you’re not seeing double, either – Vauxhall also has another small SUV called the Mokka, which trades some of the Crossland’s practicality for sleeker styling. Plus there’s an electric version of the Mokka too.

The Crossland isn’t an ugly sister, mind, it’s had a makeover, with a more modern-looking grille, sharper bumpers and headlights, plus some jazzier wheel options. Inside there have been some changes to trims and upholstery, but it’s largely business as usual otherwise, meaning solid rather than plush plastics.

There have been some changes to the infotainment system, too. It’s still a 7 or 8-inch touchscreen depending on which model you buy, but they both come with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto as standard, so it doesn’t really make sense to go for the bigger system, and its standard built-in sat-nav, unless you really need it.

Either system is easy to get your head around in terms of layout and the bright screens respond nicely to inputs, but it’s a shame the graphical design isn’t a bit easier on the eye and that digital driver dials aren’t even available as an option like they are in some classier alternatives.

Don't be afraid to buy the diesel if you do enough miles, but most will love the 120hp 1.2 petrol. Sporty SRi is the best looking trim.

Mat Watson
Mat Watson
carwow expert

Still, space is great for the two people in the front and the driver will get his or her driving position sorted with ease. It’s a great driving position too, with superb forward visibility. In the back, knee room for tall adults is average, but headroom is very good, while more expensive models come with a sliding rear bench which is a nice practical touch.

Not that you’ll necessarily need to shove them forward that often, because the Crossland’s boot is a generous size with them rammed back as far as they’ll go anyway, being just a little bigger than a Kamiq’s or Arona’s. It’s a useful shape, too, there are some hooks for hanging bags and an adjustable boot floor that eliminates any annoying step with the car’s rear seats folded flat. They fold in a useful 60:40 configuration too. Nice.

Not so nice: the way the Crossland drives. It’s not the engines, because they’re great. You can choose between a 1.2-litre three-cylinder petrol with 83, 110 or 130hp, or a 1.5 diesel with 110 or 120hp. If you do enough miles, don’t be afraid to go for one of these smooth, quiet engines, but the majority of people will love the 110hp petrol. It’s strong, yet efficient and more than up to coping on all types of roads.

The problems lie elsewhere, despite suspension and steering updates for 2021. The Crossland isn’t as comfortable as a T-Cross, nor as quiet on the move and although no car of this type is an outright sports car on country roads, you’ll have more fun in an Arona. You just will. Still, the Crossland isn’t terrible – it’s average, so if you’re happy to put up with it, it shouldn’t be a deal-breaker.

If you love a plush cabin, the latest tech or a fun drive, there are better small SUVs. But if you’re more bothered about a keen price, generous equipment levels and decent space inside, head to our deals page for the very latest offers.

Buy a new or used Vauxhall Crossland at a price you’ll love
We take the hassle and haggle out of car buying by finding you great deals from local and national dealers
RRP £19,355 - £27,775 Avg. carwow saving £1,883 off RRP
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Is this car right for you?
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