Vauxhall Crossland Review & Prices

The Vauxhall Crossland has great engine options, decent boot space and practical sliding rear seats on some models. It’s average to drive, though, and alternatives offer swankier infotainment options

Buy or lease the Vauxhall Crossland at a price you’ll love
We take the hassle and haggle out of car buying by finding you great deals from local and national dealers
RRP £28,205 - £30,345 Avg. Carwow saving £5,778 off RRP
Carwow price from
Cash
£22,489
Monthly
£220*
Used
£9,400
Ready to see prices tailored to you?
Compare new offers Compare used deals
wowscore
5/10
Reviewed by Carwow after extensive testing of the vehicle.

What's good

  • Efficient engine options
  • Easy-to-use infotainment
  • Decent boot space

What's not so good

  • Lack of digital dials option
  • Not much fun to drive
  • Not very comfortable over bumps

Find out more about the Vauxhall Crossland

Is the Vauxhall Crossland a good car?

The Vauxhall Crossland is a small SUV that has a range of efficient engines, bold colour options and practical sliding rear seats. These days there’s a simply staggering choice of cars like the Crossland, including the Peugeot 2008, VW T-Cross, Skoda Kamiq and SEAT Arona to name just a few.

Now, if you’re suffering from a case of déjà vu, fear not, because the Crossland was formerly called the Crossland X. And you’re not seeing double, either – Vauxhall also has another small SUV called the Mokka, which trades some of the Crossland’s practicality for sleeker styling. Plus there’s an electric Mokka, too.

The Vauxhall Crossland is a bit like Snoop Dogg, then. Originally called Snoop Doggy Dogg, he went through a name change but the end product was ultimately more of the same.

The Crossland isn’t an ugly sister, mind. It’s had a makeover, with a more modern-looking grille, sharper bumpers and headlights, plus some jazzier wheel options. Inside there have been some changes to trims and upholstery, but it’s largely business as usual otherwise, meaning solid rather than plush plastics.

There have been some changes to the infotainment system, too. It’s still a 7.0- or 8.0-inch touchscreen depending on which model you buy, but they both come with Apple CarPlay and Android Auto as standard, so it doesn’t really make sense to go for the bigger system, and its standard built-in sat-nav, unless you really need it.

Either system is easy to get your head around in terms of layout and the bright screens respond nicely to inputs, but it’s a shame the graphical design isn’t a bit easier on the eye and that digital driver dials aren’t even available as an option like they are in some classier alternatives.

It might not be thrilling to drive but the Crossland has a couple of excellent engines to choose from

Still, space is great for the two people in the front and the driver will get their driving position sorted with ease. It’s a great driving position too, with superb forward visibility. In the back, knee room for tall adults is average, but headroom is very good, while more expensive models come with a sliding rear bench which is a nice practical touch.

Not that you’ll necessarily need to shove them forward that often, because the Crossland’s boot is a generous size with them rammed back as far as they’ll go anyway, being just a little bigger than a Kamiq’s or Arona’s. It’s a useful shape, too, there are some hooks for hanging bags and an adjustable boot floor that eliminates any annoying step with the car’s rear seats folded flat. They fold in a useful 60:40 configuration too. Nice.

Not so nice: the way the Crossland drives. It’s not the engines, because they’re great. There's just the two options, both being 1.2-litre petrols with a choice of 110hp or 130hp. You'll have to find a used Vauxhall Crossland if you want a diesel, but If you do enough miles, don’t be afraid to go for one of these smooth, quiet engines. That said, the majority of people will love the 110hp petrol. It’s strong yet efficient, and more than up to coping on all types of roads.

The problems lie elsewhere, despite suspension and steering updates in 2021. The Crossland isn’t as comfortable as a T-Cross, nor as quiet on the move. And although no car of this type is an outright sports car on country roads, you’ll have more fun in an Arona. Still, the Crossland isn’t terrible – it’s average, so if you’re happy to put up with it, it shouldn’t be a deal-breaker.

If you love a plush cabin, the latest tech or a fun drive, there are better small SUVs. But if you’re more bothered about a keen price, generous equipment levels and decent space inside, check out how much you could save on our Vauxhall Crossland deals. You can also browse used Vauxhall Crossland models as well as other used Vauxhalls from a network of trusted dealers, and if you need to sell your car, carwow can help with that too.

How much is the Vauxhall Crossland?

The Vauxhall Crossland has a RRP range of £28,205 to £30,345. However, with Carwow you can save on average £5,778. Prices start at £22,489 if paying cash. Monthly payments start at £220. The price of a used Vauxhall Crossland on Carwow starts at £9,400.

Our most popular versions of the Vauxhall Crossland are:

Model version Carwow price from
1.2 Turbo Ultimate 5dr £22,489 Compare offers
Buy or lease the Vauxhall Crossland at a price you’ll love
We take the hassle and haggle out of car buying by finding you great deals from local and national dealers
RRP £28,205 - £30,345 Avg. Carwow saving £5,778 off RRP
Carwow price from
Cash
£22,489
Monthly
£220*
Used
£9,400
Ready to see prices tailored to you?
Compare new offers Compare used deals
Vauxhall Crossland
Configure your own Crossland on Carwow
Save on average £5,778 off RRP
  • Configure colour, engine, trim & much more
  • Receive offers from local and national dealers
  • Compare by price, location, buyer reviews and availability
  • Using Carwow is 100% free and confidential