The top 10 best mini-MPVs on sale

Mini MPVs offer most of the flexibility of their larger counterparts, but in a package that’s generally more manageable for city drivers. Low running costs, lots of practicality and a comfortable, refined driving experience are all characteristics family buyers rate highly. We’ve picked our 10 favourite mini MPVs currently on sale.

Head over to our new car deals page to see how much you could save on any of the cars featured in this list. If you need a little more space, check out our list of the best MPVs overall or, for something a little taller, check out our list of the best small SUVs. If you’re ready to buy a new car right away, use our PCP calculator to get a better idea how much it could cost.

1. Ford B-Max

The Ford B-Max is unique in its segment because it offers sliding rear doors, doing away with a central pillar. This means access is incredibly easy for rear passengers, making it a great choice for those with young children or reduced mobility. Once you’re in, there’s a good amount of space for both passengers and luggage – it’s not class-leading but, considering the car’s small footprint, Ford has done a good job with the B-Max’s packaging.

Being based on the Fiesta means the car is incredibly easy to drive and could even be classed as entertaining on the road. It also shares the Fiesta’s familiar cabin, with good equipment levels across its range , mired only slightly by a few fiddly controls. You’ll also find the B-Max cheap to run but be careful because top-spec Titanium and Titanium X cars might cost more than you’d imagine.

Find out how much carwow can save you with our Ford B-Max deals page.

2. BMW 2 Series Active Tourer

When BMW first launched its 2 Series Active Tourer, many of the company’s die-hard fans were shocked. However the Active Tourer has opened up a whole new group of customers, who value the car’s excellent practicality and usability as well as its premium badge. Access for driver and passengers is easy thanks to wide-opening doors, with a high up driving position that’s not too dissimilar to a crossover’s.

You’ll also appreciate the BMW’s fantastic cabin, which is a notch up even from its main rival, the Mercedes B-Class. The iDrive infotainment system is class-leading, and has all sorts of connectivity options, too. Both diesel and petrol engines offer great fuel economy, although the Active Tourer isn’t exactly cheap in the first place.

3. VW Golf SV

The normal Volkswagen Golf is one of the best-selling cars in the UK and, by adding extra practicality, Volkswagen has made the Golf SV a great option for those who need that extra flexibility. The higher roof-line and slightly raised seating makes entry and exit a doddle, with plenty of adjustment for the driver and a sliding/reclining bench seat in the back, too.

The 590-litre boot is notably larger than all its main rivals, and it shares its high-quality cabin with the regular Golf, so quality and usability are guaranteed. The available diesel engines are very economical but, if you don’t do many miles, you’ll be better off with one of the flexible turbocharged petrols – the excellent 1.0-litre BlueMotion can achieve 62mpg.

Our Volkswagen Golf SV deals page can help you save money on your new car.

4. Mercedes B-Class

Attractive styling and a posh badge aren’t the only things the Mercedes B-Class has going for it. It’s a great all-rounder that’s surprisingly affordable to run and there’s even a hybrid version. With an easy step-in height and large door openings, it’s easy to climb in or fit a child seat. Buyers will appreciate the Mercedes’ upmarket design – cabin design is shared with some pricier cars in the manufacturer’s lineup.

Equipment levels are surprisingly good – even basic SE versions come with a reversing camera and automatic city braking as standard. It’s also effortless to drive, with the optional seven-speed automatic gearbox feeling especially well suited to the car – both city and motorway driving is easy regardless of engine choice.

Check out our Mercedes B-Class deals page to discover the latest offers.

5. Vauxhall Meriva

The Vauxhall Meriva is another mini MPV that offers unconventional access for rear passengers – its doors are rear hinged like a Rolls Royce. This makes access easier than in more conventional rivals, if not quite as effortless as the Ford B-Max. Nevertheless, the Meriva offers more all-round space than its main rival, with a larger boot and trick seats that give rear passengers more personal space.

The tall body means drivers have an excellent view of the road, and the Vauxhall offers a relaxed and refined driving experience that’ll suit most drivers’ needs. The Meriva’s cabin has a few too many fiddly buttons for our tastes and the engine line-up is a little dated when compared to some rivals, both in terms of fuel economy and performance.

Find out how much carwow can save you with our Vauxhall Meriva deals page.

6. Renault Scenic

The Renault Scenic was one of the original mini MPVs and it still has lots of appeal for those who want a capable and safe family car. It’s been on sale for a few years now but the current Scenic is one of the most spacious options around. There’s three proper seats in the back with easily accessible isofix points and a huge, well shaped boot that should be more than capable of fitting a week’s holiday luggage.

You might not find the Renault’s cabin quite as stylish or well made as more modern rivals, but the large digital readouts and raised seating position make it a nice place to spend time. The Scenic also has a range of economical engines – the 1.5-litre diesels are particularly frugal, but the 1.2-litre turbocharged petrol engine still manages around 50mpg and is cheaper to buy in the first place.

Our Renault Scenic deals page can help you save money on your new car.

7. Honda Jazz

Honda’s Jazz might be one of the smallest vehicles here, but that doesn’t stop it being a very practical mini MPV, thanks to some innovative packaging by Honda. Wide opening doors both front and back mean accessibility is great and the slightly raised seats result in a driving position that gives a tad more visibility than your average supermini. There’s a large 354-litre boot, and the rear seats can either fold flat or flip up to enable you to carry taller items.

The Jazz’s other highlights include low running costs and light steering that makes town driving a doddle. Equipment levels are pleasingly high across all trims, but we’re not too keen on the touchscreen interface for the infotainment system – it seems a little complicated. Honda also has an excellent reputation for reliability, which should mean great long-term ownership prospects.

Check out our Honda Jazz deals page to discover the latest offers.

8. Toyota Prius+

The Toyota Prius+ builds on the success of the regular Prius, adding just what many buyers wanted – enhanced practicality. The larger body offers not only increased space for luggage and passengers, but has allowed Toyota to squeeze in an extra pair of seats – perfect for children, but possibly a squeeze for anyone approaching adult size.

The rest of the Prius+ is very similar to its smaller brother, so the seating position is a little lower than some of the other cars on this list, and an automatic gearbox comes as standard. Of course, being a hybrid means fuel economy should be impressive, but this only really applies if you do lots of town driving – regular motorway users will be better served by a diesel model.

Find out how much carwow can save you with our Toyota Prius+ deals page.

9. Fiat 500L

Fiat offers a 500 variant for nearly everyone, and the 500L is there for those who need extra space and versatility, but don’t want to sacrifice the retro styling of the original. While the 500L’s looks are a little divisive, it undeniably makes a great mini MPV – there are 22 storage bins dotted throughout the cabin, and a sliding rear bench seat can provide near-limo levels of legroom.

Light steering and a comfortable ride mean the 500L is perfect for trips to the local supermarket, and you’ll find it easy to get in and out thanks to lightweight doors and large openings. Cheaper variants represent good value for money and the 1.4-litre turbocharged petrol engine suits the car’s cheeky character well. We’d avoid the pricier diesel versions – they can end up on the wrong side of £20,000 without too much difficulty.

Our Fiat 500L deals page can help you save money on your new car.

10. Kia Venga

If you’re after a great value, no-fuss mini MPV, the Kia Venga could be just what you’re looking for. It may lack the extrovert styling of Kia’s more recent models, but this smart looking car feels much larger inside than those tiny exterior dimensions would suggest. You also get plenty of kit – some of which you’d struggle to find on vehicles the next size up.

The Venga is also a very safe car to travel in – there are lots of airbags and it’s easy to attach a child seat thanks to the large rear doors. It misses out on more hi-tech kit such as automatic city braking and blind-spot monitoring, however. Probably the largest draw for many buyers, though, will be Kia’s industry-leading seven-year warranty – most cars on this list have less than half of that so, if you’re intending to keep your car a long time, it’s worth considering.

Check out our Kia Venga deals page to discover the latest offers.

Save money on your new mini MPV

If you’re interested in any of these mini MPVs, our new car deals page will find you the best discounts from dealers across the UK. Alternatively, if you’re still struggling to decide what your next car will be, our car chooser is here to help narrow your search. When you’ve picked your perfect car, use our PCP calculator to get a better idea how much it could cost.

Ford B-Max

Mini MPV has lots of space and novel sliding rear doors
8.5
£15,345 - £19,795
RRP
Read review Compare offers

Volkswagen Golf SV

Spacious MPV version of the Golf is an excellent family car
7.7
£19,475 - £27,830
RRP
Read review Compare offers

Mercedes B-Class

Practical premium family car
6.8
£22,170 - £34,660
RRP
Read review Compare offers
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