Kia Ceed Performance

RRP from
£18,460
average carwow saving
£1,906
MPG
48.7 - 74.3
0-60 mph in
8.6 - 10.9 secs
First year road tax
£145 - £205

The Kia Ceed is easy to drive and comfortable but it won’t put a big grin on your face on a twisty country road like some other hatchbacks

View available deals
Performance and Economy

You can get the Kia Ceed with a range of two petrol and two diesel engines and with either a six-speed manual or seven-speed automatic gearbox.

The entry-level 120hp petrol is a very good all-rounder – especially if you do lots of city driving. It feels reasonably perky when you pull out of junctions and doesn’t struggle too much when you head out onto a motorway. Sure, it’s a little noisy when you accelerate hard to overtake slow-moving traffic but it’s smooth when you’re just cruising along and won’t cost the earth to run. Kia claims it’ll return 52.3mpg, but you can expect it to manage a figure in the high forties in normal driving conditions.

If you do a more balanced mix of town and country driving, you’ll want to consider the slightly more powerful 140hp 1.4-litre turbo petrol. It feels slightly less strained at motorway speeds than 120hp versions, and still returns around 46mpg in normal driving conditions compared to Kia’s claimed 48.7mpg.

Driving the Kia Ceed won’t leave you feeling thrilled – instead you can expect to be mildly surprised by its ability to iron-out monster potholes like a much bigger car

Mat Watson
carwow expert

If you do lots of long motorway journeys, you’ll want to consider the 115hp 1.6-litre diesel engine. It doesn’t feel as fast as the two petrols but it’ll cruise along happily at 70mph and uses noticeably less fuel. Kia claims it’ll return 74.3mpg but we managed a whopping 85mpg on a mix of motorway and country roads. Pair this model with the optional Eco Pack (that includes lowered suspension, special tyres and various hidden aerodynamic aides) and this diesel engine produces just 99g/km of CO2. As a result, it’ll cost just £145 per year to tax.

Every Kia Ceed comes with a six-speed manual gearbox as standard that’s smooth and easy to use in town. If your commute takes in lengthy traffic jams, however, you’ll want to consider paying extra for the optional seven-speed automatic. This unit is available in the 115hp diesel and 140hp petrol models and actually improves fuel economy by a couple of miles per gallon.

It’s a little jerky at slow speeds and changes gear a little too aggressively when you accelerate hard, but it’ll certainly take the sting out of seemingly endless stop-start traffic.

Let dealers compete over you
Save £1,906
On average carwow buyers save £1,906 off the RRP of the Kia Ceed they configure.
Avg. carwow saving for this car
Build this car & compare your offers
  • Compare local and national dealers
  • Compare by price, location, buyer reviews and availability
  • Enjoy car buying without the hassle and haggle
Comfort and Handling

The Kia Ceed is very easy to drive and fairly comfortable – exactly what you want from a small family hatchback.

The steering is light which helps make manoeuvring through tight gaps in traffic as easy as possible and the suspension does a reasonably good job of ironing out bumps and potholes. Sure, the Kia Ceed bounces slightly more than a VW Golf over particularly large potholes, but you won’t feel any jarring thuds through your seat – even on noticeably pockmarked roads.

The Ceed doesn’t lean noticeably in the corners so your passengers in the back should have no reason to feel carsick. It doesn’t feel quite as nimble as a Ford Focus, however, but will happily dispatch a few tight hairpin bends on a quiet country road.

This softer, more comfort-oriented suspension helps reduce the amount of annoying tyre noise you hear on motorways, too. Unfortunately, there’s still a fair amount of wind noise cooked up by the Kia Ceed’s door mirrors at 70mph. Still – at least you get cruise control as standard to help you while away long motorway journeys.

Around town – where you’ll probably spend most of your time – the Ceed’s large windows and reasonably slim door pillars give you a good view out so you can spot traffic approaching at junctions and manoeuvre through tight gaps without breaking a sweat.

On the subject of tight gaps – if the thought of parallel parking puts the fear of God into you, go for a top-spec First Edition model. These come with a neat self-parking feature that’ll steer for you into tight bay and parallel parking spaces. If you don’t mind taking the plunge yourself but wouldn’t mind a little extra help, mid-range ‘3’ cars come with rear parking sensors and every Kia Ceed gets a reversing camera as standard – not bad for an affordable family hatchback.

Equally impressive, is the amount of standard safety kit you get across the Kia Ceed range. Even entry-level ‘2’ cars come with cruise control, lane-keeping assist and automatic emergency braking that’ll hit the brakes if the car detects an obstacle in its path ahead.

Pick a top-spec First Edition model with an automatic gearbox, and you get what Kia calls Lane Following Assist – a feature that’ll search for gaps in motorway traffic and help you move into lanes with less congestion. More usefully, it’ll steer for you to keep you in your lane and works alongside the adaptive cruise control feature to keep a safe distance to other cars by braking and accelerating when necessary. All these features should help the Kia Ceed earn a high score when it’s crash-tested by Euro NCAP.

Looking for great Ceed offers?

On carwow you can easily compare the best new car offers from local and national dealers. Get a great Ceed deal without any of the usual hassle!

Compare offers