Mercedes-Benz EQE SUV Review & Prices

Having similar styling to the EQS SUV, the EQE SUV is a family-friendly EV with high-end equipment, but it’s quite expensive

Buy or lease the Mercedes-Benz EQE SUV at a price you’ll love
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RRP £90,560 - £121,760
Carwow price from
Cash
£90,560
Monthly
£1,263*
Used
£69,499
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Find out more about the Mercedes-Benz EQE SUV

Is the Mercedes EQE SUV a good car?

The Mercedes EQE SUV runs in the same vein as the EQE saloon by being the mid-size option for Mercedes – this time in the SUV segment. The all-electric model has been produced in a similar vein to the EQS and EQS SUV by being the built-up version of the electric saloon, and carries similar styling.

It looks a lot like Mercedes has put the EQS SUV through a photocopier and set it to 80%. If you weren’t told which one was which from a picture, you wouldn’t be able to tell the difference.

The face of the EQE SUV has a large black faux grille with lots of three-pointed stars inside it, while there are large inlets around the bottom edge. Along the side, it’s a pretty standard SUV shape, while the back of the car has a light bar connecting the rear brake lights.

The roofline is designed with aerodynamics in mind – as the EQE and EQS-derived vehicles look a lot like a smoothed pebble or Apple Magic Mouse.

In the cabin, you’ll find wood trim and black leather upholstery as standard alongside piano black in the middle and metallic detailing around the edges and vents. You also get a central touchscreen and a digital driver’s display behind the steering wheel, while ambient lighting adds colour to the darker areas of the cabin.

If the EQE and EQS SUV are anything to go by, the EQE SUV should have loads of space in the cabin, with the flat floor allowing for lots of foot and legroom, while headroom should also be excellent.

The boot is 520 litres, which isn’t spectacular, but it’s more than a BMW iX – likely to be a close alternative. The Audi Q8 e-tron has a 569-litre space though, while a Jaguar I-Pace has a 577-litre boot.

You get two battery options with the EQE SUV, both coming with 4Matic all-wheel drive and each with a different motor. The 350 ‘entry’ version gets an 89kWh battery, while the 500 is fitted with a 91kWh pack – so there’s little difference there.

Where the 500 steps ahead of the 350 is its power output. The lower-powered 350 has 288hp and 765Nm of torque, while the 500 develops 402hp and 858Nm, meaning more performance but less range.

The EQE SUV comes with similar features to its bigger EQS sibling, but it’s expensive and doesn’t stand out very much

With the smaller battery yet less powerful motor setup, you can get up to 334 miles, while the 500 gets up to 324 miles despite the larger battery pack.

For charging, both can be charged on AC at 22kW, while DC charging rates are capped at 170kW – still quick enough to charge the batteries from 10-80% in around 30 minutes.

If the EQS SUV and EQE are anything to go by, the EQE SUV should be quiet, comfortable and easy to drive around. The town aspect could be tricky though, as the EQE SUV has a 12.3m turning circle that larger cars, like the Range Rover, can easily beat. The top two trims do get 10-degree rear-axle steering to help that though.

As standard there’s a reversing camera, but only the entry model doesn’t get all-around cameras, making urban life slightly simpler.

With air suspension as standard, long-distance comfort should be excellent. All but the entry model get adaptive cruise control and blind spot monitoring alongside other key safety systems, so the base AMG Line – although the most affordable – may be the one trim to avoid.

Weighing north of 2,500kg, the EQE SUV probably won’t be the most dynamic car to drive. Sure you’ll have plenty of punch from the motors and the air suspension should deal with most of the lean that you’ll get going through sharper bends, but we don’t expect it to be a sporty SUV. Leave that to the likes of the BMW iX M60 or Porsche Cayenne Turbo GT if you still want some petrol power in your life.

One major drawback of the EQE SUV is the price. Starting from £90,560, it certainly isn’t cheap and it is severely undercut by the BMW iX and Audi Q8 e-tron – similarly-sized alternatives that offer a comparative finish and feel.

Once we’ve driven the EQE SUV, we’ll update this with our full impressions. But in the meantime, check out deals on Mercedes models on carwow, where you can also buy used Mercedes models that could be more your style.

If you want to save up some money for an EQE SUV or sell the car you’ve currently got, you can sell your car through carwow. Our trusted dealers will bid on your car to get you the best price for it.

How much is the Mercedes EQE SUV?

The Mercedes-Benz EQE SUV has a RRP range of £90,560 to £121,760. Prices start at £90,560 if paying cash. Monthly payments start at £1,263. The price of a used Mercedes-Benz EQE SUV on Carwow starts at £69,499.

Our most popular versions of the Mercedes-Benz EQE SUV are:

Model version Carwow price from
EQE 350 4Matic 215kW AMG Line 89kWh 5dr Auto £90,560 Compare offers
EQE 350 4Matic 215kW AMG Line Prem 89kWh 5dr Auto £99,260 Compare offers
EQE 500 4Matic 300kW Business Class 91kWh 5dr Auto £121,760 Compare offers
Buy or lease the Mercedes-Benz EQE SUV at a price you’ll love
We take the hassle and haggle out of car buying by finding you great deals from local and national dealers
RRP £90,560 - £121,760
Carwow price from
Cash
£90,560
Monthly
£1,263*
Used
£69,499
Ready to see prices tailored to you?
Compare new offers Compare used deals
Mercedes-Benz EQE SUV
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