Hyundai i10 Review

The Hyundai i10 brings sharper-than-ever looks to the city car party along with a healthy amount of standard safety kit and a practical boot. Shame about the sluggish entry-level model though…

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9/10
wowscore
This score is awarded by our team of
expert reviewers
With nearly 60 years of experience between them, carwow’s expert reviewers thoroughly test every car on sale on carwow, and so are perfectly placed to present you the facts and help you make that exciting decision
after extensive testing of the car

What's good

  • Looks stylish
  • Very easy to drive
  • Good-sized boot for such a small car

What's not so good

  • Really basic entry-level models
  • Cheapest petrol engine is gutless
  • Alternatives have more eye-catching interiors

Hyundai i10: what would you like to read next?

Overall verdict

The Hyundai i10 is a bit like owning a table football set rather than having to look after a full-sized pitch. It’s a bit of cheap-and-cheerful fun you can enjoy every day that still has a hint of sportiness about it.

Even the old i10 looked a bit edgier than other super-small hatchbacks, but this new version goes further with a set of pointed headlights and a pinched grille that look more like they belong on a dinky hot hatch than a cost-cutting city car. High-spec models even come with a sporty-looking (but entirely fake) rear diffuser – if you’re into that sort of thing.

The Hyundai i10’s cabin makes a good first impression, too. You get some cool textured trims on the doors and the air vents look like Hyundai’s engineers found them in a box marked ‘Mercedes’.

The infotainment system’s pretty easy-on-the-eye too, and it’s mostly pretty simple to use. The built-in sat-nav system is a bit clunky, but you’ll probably just connect your phone and use its maps instead.

There isn’t much you can do about all the scratchy plastics on the Hyundai i10’s dashboard and doors, however, but then most small cars feel pretty hard inside and at least the i10’s textured trims give you something to file your nails on while you’re stuck at a set of traffic lights.

You might struggle to give your hair-do a once over at the same time if you’re very tall, but there’s enough space for six-footers in the front and just enough space behind for equally tall passengers to get comfy – on short trips at least. There’s enough room for a weekly shop in the boot, too, and it’s all fairly easy to load.

The Hyundai i10 does everything you need from a small city car. It’s easy to drive, cheap to run, fairly practical and has a decent amount of kit – in mid-range models, at least

Mat Watson
carwow expert

Speaking of shopping, the Hyundai i10 feels right at home pottering around town. Its dinky dimensions and light controls mean it’s easy to squeeze through tight gaps and into narrow parking spaces and the large windows give you a really clear view out. Although, even small SUVs such as the Hyundai Kona will loom menacingly over the tiny i10.

The entry-level car with its 67hp engine feels especially swamped in traffic – you’ll be much better off going for a 1.2-litre four-cylinder or turbocharged 1.0-litre model instead.

These 84hp and 100hp models let you take in the odd dual-carriageway or motorway trip without feeling like a Dachshund trying to keep up with a pack of greyhounds. Once up to speed, the Hyundai i10 is pretty quiet for such a small car and you get loads of clever safety tech to keep you safe, including lane-keeping assist and automatic emergency braking.

Sure, the suspension is a little on the firm side, but the i10 will soak up potholes and manhole covers fairly well and its slick gearshift and confidence-inspiring steering make it surprisingly fun to drive on a twisty road.

That said, you won’t be having much fun in the entry-level 67hp model, but go for one of the i10’s perkier engines and you’ll have a great all-round city car that’s practical enough to live with, comes with a decent amount of equipment and is even pretty good fun to drive.

See how much you can save on your next new car by heading over to our Hyundai deals page.

Buy a new or used Hyundai i10 at a price you’ll love
We take the hassle and haggle out of car buying by finding you great deals from local and national dealers
RRP £12,820 - £17,120 Avg. carwow saving £1,002 off RRP
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