Mercedes B-Class MPV colours guide and prices

Well-equipped and compact, the Mercedes B-Class is a premium MPV that delivers comfort, quality and space in spadefuls. If you’ve decided to purchase one, your exterior colour will make a difference to how quickly dirt shows up on your vehicle, and the speed and ease of reselling.

The B-Class offers three different trim levels, with all the colour options below available on all of them. If you want to understand the difference between solid, metallic and special finishes, our paint types guide will tell you all you need to know.

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Standard finishes

Cirrus White – £0

A dazzling white, this is one of the UK’s most sought-after car colours, so selling your B-Class on should give you no problems at all. You won’t pay any extra for this popular hue, too. To keep it looking pristine, though, you’ll need to clean it more often than just about any other shade.

Jupiter Red – £0

This classic, pillar box red is also a no-cost option. Smart and pretty tasteful, it should do a middling job of hiding the dirt between washes. While monochromatic shades may change hands more quickly, this shouldn’t keep you hanging around too long when the time comes to sell on.

Metallic finishes

Cosmos Black – £575

This shiny pitch black is a perennially popular shade, much favoured for London cabs, corporate fleets and chauffeur driven vehicles. A good choice for executive models, it will resell with minimal hassle, and do a pretty good job of concealing the dirt. Don’t stint on the car washes, though – cheaper ones often leave behind unsightly swirl marks.

Northern Lights Violet – £575

This is a deep, dark purple. It may not be everyone’s first choice of colour for their B-Class, something which could affect resale speed. However, if you’re keen to stand out on the road, this could well be the colour for you. And because it’s a darker shade, you should find grubbiness stays hidden for a decent length of time.

South Sea Blue – £575

This is a relatively bright sky blue that, again, may not be your first choice if you’re after something more sober. That said, blue cars are certainly not unpopular, so selling on shouldn’t present too many headaches. As a mid-range shade, it should do an average job of offering dirt a hiding place.

Elbaite Green – £575

If you’re looking for something a shade different from the standard monochrome, this distinctive mid-spectrum green could be spot on. It’s not exactly what most would call garish, but you may find it’s not everyone’s perfect car colour when you offer it for resale. It should hide dirt longer than lighter shades, but not for as long as a darker colour.

Orient Bronze – £575

While this shade of bronze is comparatively restrained, you’ll certainly stand out at the lights or on the school run. Like the green and violet, it may not be to everyone’s taste, so prepare for a potentially longer wait for a used buyer. In terms of not showing up the inevitable road dirt, however, it should fare very well.

Mountain Grey – £575

This grey lies towards the darker end of the spectrum, and is likely to be a good choice if you prefer to play it safe. This smart colour is a popular one with car buyers right now, so they’ll be beating a path to your door when the time comes to sell your B-Class. It won’t take frequent washes to keep this car looking good, either.

Polar Silver – £575

This smart colour is lighter than the grey, so expect more dirt to be visible more rapidly. Given the popularity of silver as a car shade, though, you won’t be kept hanging around waiting for a buyer, making this shade a smart, tasteful and sensible choice.

What next?

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Mercedes B-Class

Practical premium family car
£22,170 - £34,660
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