The best sports cars with big boots

There are plenty of sports cars that compromise cargo room in favour of fitting a bigger engine or a sexier body meaning space-poor buyers are left with few choices.

If you want something rakish, sporty and fast, however, that offers reasonable luggage capacity, here are a few models you may want to consider.

Don’t forget, you can put any of these cars in our car configurator to see how much carwow could help you save.

Mercedes-Benz SL

It would be hard to say the Mercedes-Benz SL is anything but a sports car, especially when you look at its performance figures. Even with the roof down, taking up valuable boot space, you still get a usable 364-litre bay.

Put the roof up and you then get an almost cavernous 504 litres of boot space, which is pretty good for such a sleek and sporty car. Despite this, it’ll accelerate from 0-60mph in as little as four seconds.

See the discounts on offer by speccing up a Mercedes SL in our car configurator.

BMW M6 Coupe

The BMW M6 Coupe has a 4.4-litre V8 petrol engine developing 560hp that gets you to 60mph from a standing start in just 3.9 seconds. It also gets BMW’s legendary driving dynamics so feels stable and secure at any speed.

Despite that fabulously powerful engine, the M6 has as much boot space as any other 6 Series – 460 litres to be precise. That’s 130 litres more than the Jaguar XKR and 360 litres more than the paltry 100 litres you get in an Audi R8.

Put the BMW M6 in our car configurator to see how much you could save.

Toyota GT86

The Toyota GT86 (or Subaru BRZ) is a seriously sporty little car, but comes with just enough boot space for two people’s weekend gear. Admittedly, 243 litres isn’t a great deal of capacity, but the back seats fold in a 50:50 split.

Toyota claims that gives you enough room to carry a set of spare tyres for a track day, which means it’s definitely enough room for a few soft bags.

Pick your ideal Toyota GT86 or Subaru BRZ in our car configurator to see the deals on offer.

Ferrari California T

While you’re never going to use a Ferrari California to move house, it offers almost 340 litres of boot space. That’s not exactly gargantuan, but certainly more than you get with most other sports cars.

This Italian thoroughbred’s trump card, however, is the fact that there’s also enough room on the back row for a couple of kids, or a couple of very small adults for very short journeys anyway.

Nissan GT-R

You’d struggle to describe the Nissan GT-R as practical but, compared to the likes of the Audi R8, its 315-litre boot capacity is pretty good. The opening suffers from a fairly high lip but, like the California T, the relatively large Nissan has enough room on the back row for two kids.

Realistically, while people will complain if they’re stuck in the back for long, those extra seats offer a little extra room for additional luggage if the boot capacity isn’t quite enough.

Choose your ideal Nissan GT-R in our car configurator to see the offers available.

Aston Martin Rapide S

Not only does the Aston Martin Rapide S give you a relatively usable 315 litres of boot capacity, it even has four doors so adults can use the back seats. The snarling 6.0-litre V12 gives the Rapide an opulent feeling few cars can match.

It may not match the average hot hatch in terms of practicality, but this much style, performance, luxury and brand kudos more than makes up for the compact luggage arrangements.

Find out how much you could save by speccing up an Aston Martin Rapide S in our car configurator.

Lexus RC F

If you want a sports coupe that looks good, drives well, and has a handful of practical touches, the Lexus RC F might be what you’re looking for. It might not be quite as thrilling to drive as some of its rivals, but its 366 litres of boot space is more than most can offer in this class.

Passenger room in the rear is limited and you don’t have the back doors for easy entry like you have with the Rapide. On the other hand, the lack of back doors helps the sporty credentials of the Lexus, including its racy styling.

Pick your perfect Lexus RC F in our car configurator to see the discounts on offer.

Subaru WRX STi

Look beyond the Subaru WRX STi’s boy-racer image and you begin to appreciate just how practical it is in this company. It’s a four-door saloon with enough room for two adults in the back, and it also boasts a very user-friendly 460 litres of boot space.

It may only bring a 2.5-litre four-cylinder engine to the party, but clever Japanese technology squeezes 296hp and 300 lb ft of torque out of it. This makes for some very lively performance.

See the savings available by putting the Subaru WRX STi in our car configurator.

Ford Mustang

The Ford Mustang may only have two doors in true muscle car style, but it also has usable back seats and up to 368 litres of boot space. Its rear seats are small but adults could use them for very brief journeys.

Build and material quality might lag a little behind its German rivals, but the sound and performance of that 5.0-litre V8 more than makes up for any shortcomings in that department.

Spec up a Ford Mustang in our car configurator to see the deals on offer.

Jaguar F-Type Coupe

The Jaguar F-Type Coupe offers quite a large amount of luggage space for the class. You get 407 litres in total and the hatchback configuration makes loading and unloading fairly easy.

More importantly, the Jaguar is available with a supercharged 5.0-litre V8 producing 543hp that accelerates from 0-60mph in just 4.1 seconds and on to a top speed of 186mph.

Put the Jaguar F-Type Coupe in our car configurator to see the potential savings.

What next?

Put any of these cars in our car configurator to see how much carwow could help you save. Still need more space? Read our list of the cars with the biggest boots. For more options, head over to our deals page or, if you’re still struggling to pick your next car, check out our car chooser.


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