Jeep Avenger Review & Prices

The Jeep Avenger looks the part and matches it with a pleasant driving experience, but isn’t the most spacious car amongst alternatives

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RRP £23,859 - £38,899 Avg. Carwow saving £1,458 off RRP
Carwow price from
Cash
£22,725
Monthly
£276*
Used
£28,997
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wowscore
8/10
Reviewed by Carwow after extensive testing of the vehicle.

What's good

  • Funky styling
  • Neat and functional interior
  • Excellent for town driving

What's not so good

  • Tight on rear space
  • Quite a lot of wind noise at motorway speeds
  • Faster charging would be a nice-to-have

Find out more about the Jeep Avenger

Is the Jeep Avenger a good car?

This is the Jeep Avenger, and it’s the first car from the iconic American brand to be designed in Europe, for Europe; it's like the car equivalent of a Royale with Cheese.

Keeping on-trend, it’s electric-only for the UK too, making it an option for your shopping list alongside the likes of the Peugeot e-2008, Vauxhall Mokka Electric and Citroen e-C4.

Despite its European roots, the Jeep Avenger sticks to the brand's trademark looks, albeit in its most miniature form yet. The result is pretty funky, with the Avenger doing a great job of standing out – something that’s not easy to do in today’s packed SUV market.

Quite a departure from any Jeep before though is the minimalist interior. The overall layout is neat, with body-coloured dashboard accenting adding a welcome hint of character, while your major touch-points in the cabin are made of good quality materials.

There’s a shedload of adjustment possible in both the driver’s seat and steering wheel. You can easily switch between the usual high-riding big Jeep position or sling yourself low down like you’re driving a Batmobile. (Oh, hang on, wrong cinematic universe…)

All versions of the Jeep Avenger are equipped with a 10.3-inch infotainment system, along with a crisp digital driver’s display. There’s nothing new or exciting about the software to report, but it’s user-friendly and also comes with wireless Android Auto and Apple CarPlay.

Passenger space in the back of this SUV is disappointing, though. Legroom is very tight behind the seats and it’s hampered further by a questionably huge hump in the middle of the floor – so carrying three across the back could be uncomfortable. At least headroom is decent.

Who’d have thought a brand so famous for its go-anywhere 4x4s could build a genuinely impressive city-focused EV? The Avenger proves Jeep can

A 380-litre boot capacity puts it short of the Peugeot e-2008, though a fair bit ahead of the Vauxhall Mokka Electric. The boxy shape of the Avenger lends well here too, creating a very usable space with no load lip – so packing stuff is an easy task.

The Jeep Avenger’s 154hp front-mounted motor draws its power from 51kWh of usable battery capacity. Official tests state a range of 249 miles on a charge, with a few days of mixed driving for this test returning 3.5mi/kWh – equating to a real-world range of around 180 miles.

Charging speeds max out at 100kW on compatible DC chargers, topping the car up to 80% in about 30 minutes. That’s not slow, but with other small electric cars like the Smart #1 beginning to offer 150kW charging, it’s already looking a tad outdated in that respect.

Town driving is the Jeep Avenger’s natural habitat. Visibility is brilliant all-round, and light steering makes it a breeze to manoeuvre. Soft-set suspension does well to absorb bumps, and the 360-degree camera on higher-spec models looks crisp on the central screen, adding to what is already an easy car to park.

There is quite a lot of wind noise coming into the car at motorway speeds, largely as a result of the boxy stature of the Avenger, but it’s liveable. There’s not much fun to be had on a back road either, but it feels composed enough when pushing on down the twisty stuff.

At its first effort, Jeep has aced the city-friendly electric car with the Avenger. Genuine stand-out looks and an excellent interior add to an effortless town-driving experience. If you have a case for more space, a Peugeot e-2008 may serve you better, though it’s otherwise hard to look beyond the Avenger.

Interested? Why not check out the latest Jeep Avenger deals, or browse used Jeep Avenger stock. You can also look at other used Jeep models from our network of trusted dealers. Want to sell your car? Well, carwow can help with that, too.

How much is the Jeep Avenger?

The Jeep Avenger has a RRP range of £23,859 to £38,899. However, with Carwow you can save on average £1,458. Prices start at £22,725 if paying cash. Monthly payments start at £276. The price of a used Jeep Avenger on Carwow starts at £28,997.

Our most popular versions of the Jeep Avenger are:

Model version Carwow price from
1.2 Longitude 5dr £22,725 Compare offers

Despite being the smallest Jeep in the range, the Avenger isn’t the cheapest – that honour goes to the Renegade. However, that cost comes down to the Avenger being an EV.

It undercuts the Peugeot e-2008 and Vauxhall Mokka Electric – just – and is similarly priced to the Smart #1 or BYD Atto 3.

There are currently three trims to pick between for the Avenger – Longitude, Altitude or Summit. There are a few option packs to add to the car too, though top-spec models are all-inclusive (sat nav aside).

Performance and drive comfort

The Jeep Avenger is most at home around town, but proves noisy at higher speeds

In town

The Jeep Avenger has nailed the town-friendly electric SUV brief in pretty much every aspect.

Manoeuvrability is great thanks to light steering, making it both a breeze to negotiate tight junctions and to park. Brilliant visibility all-round helps with that, too.

You don’t get a reversing camera as standard, rather it’s an option pack on entry-level models and equipped from mid-spec upwards. Top-spec versions of the Avenger get an excellent 360-degree camera system with guidelines on the screen. Both the camera itself and the guidance system display crisply.

A soft suspension setup lends well to absorbing even the roughest of bumps and potholes in town. You’ll notice them more at higher speeds, but it never becomes a real problem.

On the motorway

The motorway isn’t the natural home of the Jeep Avenger, but it’ll do the job for longer trips. Wind noise is fairly heavy around the A-pillars as a consequence of its boxy styling, though it’s not unbearable.

Road noise is obvious too, but that largely comes with the nature of electric vehicles and their near-silent motors.

Adaptive cruise control isn’t standard across the Avenger range. Top-spec models do come equipped with it, otherwise, you’ll need to select it as part of either the Tech & Style or ADAS packs.

On a twisty road

Don’t expect to have much fun in the Jeep Avenger on a back road, though in fairness it’s almost irrelevant in a car of this kind.

Its steering is quite numb at speed and a soft suspension setup doesn’t lend well to keeping the car planted through corners, though it feels composed enough to have confidence in carrying speed.

From a standstill, the Jeep Avenger is said to be capable of 0-60mph in around nine seconds, and you do feel it quite a kick upon initial pickup. Beyond about 40mph though, the 154hp electric motor begins to run out of puff.

Space and practicality

The Jeep Avenger offers plenty of space and adjustment up front, but legroom is tight in the back

Despite offering quite a stylish, minimalist interior, the Jeep Avenger brings plenty of storage space.

An unusual feature is a dashboard-length storage tray just below the infotainment screen. It’s not especially deep, but enough to hold keys or mobile phones, with a removable rubber mat in place to keep things from sliding around.

The centre console has a deep storage bin, big enough for a meal deal drinks bottle to sit most of the way in, with a wireless charger tucked in there too. This is covered by a magnetic folding cover which does allow for easy access, but can’t be completely removed or tucked away.

There’s even more space under the central armrest, along with vertically-aligned cup holders, though these are more like shallow grips that may struggle to take on bigger drinks – or keep them completely in place if you’re driving enthusiastically. You can squeeze a one-litre water bottle into the door bins, and the glovebox is fairly large.

As well as all this space for your stuff, there’s plenty of room for you to manoeuvre yourself. Adjustability for the driving position is fantastic. You can slide really far back or forward, and there’s a huge range of movement in the seat height. The steering wheel also offers a wide range of reach and height positioning.

Space in the back seats

While the Avenger does offer a lot of room in the front of the cabin, it does come at the expense of rear seat space.

Legroom is pretty tight, even if you do have the front seats moved far forward, and a huge floor hump eats into foot space further. Carrying three across the back for a longer journey could become an uncomfortable situation. On the plus side, there’s loads of headroom as a result of this SUV’s boxy stature.

Boot space

With 380 litres of boot space, the Jeep Avenger is about par for the course in its class. A Peugeot e-2008 will offer considerably more space at 435 litres, though the Vauxhall Mokka Electric only brings 310 litres to the table.

Loading items into the Avenger’s boot is a breeze though, thanks to its squared-off opening and lack of a load lip. There’s a shallow area underneath the floor which is handy for storing charging cables or the parcel shelf if you need to take it out, but not both at once.

If you drop the seats down with the floor in place, there is a slight hump between the two but it’s not a dramatic change. There’s a hook on either side of the boot if you need to secure loose bags as well.

Interior style, infotainment and accessories

The Jeep Avenger’s interior is nicely styled, though the infotainment software is fairly basic

A minimalist yet funky interior design adds more character to the Jeep Avenger. A simple dashboard layout is spiced up with a flash of body-coloured dashboard trim, which works best if you pick a bright hue for your car. If you opt for an entry-level car, this has a woven pattern instead.

The fabric seats come with a splash of yellow on them, either in a camouflage pattern or a two-tone gradient effect depending on your chosen spec.

All versions of the Jeep Avenger come with a 10.3-inch infotainment system sat centrally, as well as a small digital driver’s display. The software itself is fairly basic, though is intuitive enough to use and offers wireless Android Auto and Apple CarPlay. You can option sat nav, but if you plan to mirror your phone anyway, it’s not worth the expense.

If you want to add more personality to your Avenger, Jeep will also sell you a range of accessories. These include coloured mirror housings, various exterior stickers and even graphics for the front grille.

Electric range, charging and tax

In the UK, the Jeep Avenger is only sold as an electric vehicle. Power comes courtesy of a battery with 51kWh of usable capacity. Official tests state a range of 249 miles on a single charge. A few days spent with the car for this test returned 3.5mi/kWh though, equating to a real-world figure of around 180 miles. Expect that to dip slightly in the colder months too, as the battery has to work harder to get up to operating temperatures.

You can charge the Avenger at a max of 100kW on compatible DC charging. That’ll take the battery from near-flat to 80% in about 30 minutes. With the similarly-priced Smart #1 offering 150kW though, there’s a case that Jeep could have worked on a faster charging system.

At home, you can charge the Avenger at a max of 11kW on a wallbox. This is a rarity in the UK though, with most wall box systems delivering up to 7kW, which will charge the car to full in around seven hours.

Safety and security

At the time of writing, the independent safety board Euro NCAP has yet to crash test the Jeep Avenger. That said, the mechanically-similar Vauxhall Mokka and Peugeot 2008 both scored four stars – so a similar performance from the Jeep is possible.

Safety tech fitted as standard to the car includes automatic emergency braking, hill descent control and rear parking sensors. Top-spec cars come with adaptive cruise control (and this can be optioned on other models), which automatically adjusts the car’s speed on the motorway to maintain a set distance from the vehicle ahead when active.

Reliability and problems

With the Jeep Avenger a fresh arrival to the market, there’s not enough data to suggest if the car will be reliable or not yet. However, based on a variety of recent reliability surveys from a number of sources, Jeep tends to be one of the lowest-scored brands in the UK.

That said, this is an electric car. All other things equal, an EV tends to have much fewer moving parts than one with an internal combustion engine, and therefore fewer things to go wrong.

As standard, the Jeep Avenger is covered under a three-year with the battery covered under a separate eight-year warranty.

Buy or lease the Jeep Avenger at a price you’ll love
We take the hassle and haggle out of car buying by finding you great deals from local and national dealers
RRP £23,859 - £38,899 Avg. Carwow saving £1,458 off RRP
Carwow price from
Cash
£22,725
Monthly
£276*
Used
£28,997
Ready to see prices tailored to you?
Compare new offers Compare used deals
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