Ferrari FF

Big, loud, hugely fast sports car with room for four

This is the average score given by leading car publications from 9 reviews
  • Sensationally fast
  • Room for 4 adults
  • Engine sounds fantastic
  • Controversial looks
  • High price tag
  • Very wide

£238,717 Price range


4 Seats


18 MPG


Reviews for the Ferrari FF are incredibly positive.

It marks a real departure from its 612 Scaglietti predecessor, with both a practical shooting-brake rear end, and for the first time ever on a Ferrari, all-wheel drive. It’s a revolution then, but also a staggeringly good car.

Ferrari has now announced the GTC4Lusso – a ground-up refresh of the FF. It gets new exterior body panels, a restyled interior and a four-wheel-steering system to match its advanced four-wheel-drive setup.

Joining a line of previous Ferrari GTs like the 612, 456 and 412, the FF is a four-seater. It’s a proper four-seater too – you really can put four adults in there, comfortably. It even takes loads of luggage, one tester points out it has more boot space than the Porsche Panamera.

All that makes it incredibly practical – not just by Ferrari standards, but by any standards. Of course, it’s also incredibly luxurious with leather surfaces everywhere, and like all modern Ferraris, it’s also been well screwed-together.

Don’t think that being practical has made it any less great to drive. The only two complaints that crop up in reviews are a slight lack of feel through the steering wheel (response and accuracy are excellent, though) and the occasional comment that the four-wheel drive takes away a little of that thoroughbred feel… but since its advantages include the ability to go places no other Ferrari would dare, great wet-weather security and increased grip, it’s certainly not a bad thing. To top it all, it’s a very refined long-distance cruiser, too.

Like more focused Ferraris, the FF has the familiar “Manettino” switch on the steering wheel, allowing you to pick from comfort and sport modes for the suspension and engine. You can also use the gearchange paddles to select gears yourself, or stick it in auto like a true GT and waft along serenely. And very quickly.

The FF’s 7 speed gearbox is generally admired, though a couple of experts didn’t find it as smooth as on other modern Ferraris.

There’s only the one engine in the FF. It’s in the front, like a proper Ferrari GT, and it’s a V12, also like a proper Ferrari GT. It’s a 6.3-litre, has 660bhp (that means over 100bhp per litre, and we’re still talking about a naturally-aspirated engine here), and will let you top out at 208mph. Or, do 0-60mph in 3.7 seconds, if you wish. And average 18.3mpg, when you’re not doing all of the above.

Predictably, testers note an incredible turn of speed, an amazing noise, and an incredibly quick-shifting 7-speed dual-clutch transmission. It’s a brilliant powertrain, but would you expect anything less?

This is a car that costs £225,000. If you have several million to burn, then it might seem like good value. Judged objectively, it’s significantly more expensive than other four-seat supercars like the Bentley Continental GT, Aston Martin Rapide and Porsche Panamera Turbo.

That said, it’s also quicker, and more exclusive. And in many ways, more practical. However, depreciation in four seater Ferraris has historically been monumentally quick. Though we’re sure that if you’re in the market for a Ferrari FF, you’re unlikely to strike it off your list for solely value for money reason.


We suspect it’s easy to get carried away when reviewing a new Ferrari and declare it the Best Thing Ever, but reviews for the FF are balanced and realistic, and drivers still come away incredibly impressed, with everything from its engine to its practicality. It appears the biggest recurring complaint is that it’s not as enjoyable to drive as the 458 or 599 and that the width of the car makes a journey on narrow roads quite intimidating.

The love-it-or-hate-it styling may be an issue for some, but that doesn’t stop the FF from being one of the best GTs you can buy.