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Ford Mondeo Hybrid Review

The Ford Mondeo hybrid is as spacious for passengers as any Mondeo, but it’s expensive and not particularly economical

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3/10
wowscore
This score is awarded by our team of
expert reviewers
With nearly 60 years of experience between them, carwow’s expert reviewers thoroughly test every car on sale on carwow, and so are perfectly placed to present you the facts and help you make that exciting decision
after extensive testing of the car

What's good

  • Low running costs
  • Refined
  • Decently equipped

What's not so good

  • Not very fast
  • Rivals have a bigger boot
  • Diesel Mondeo just as good

Ford Mondeo Hybrid: what would you like to read next?

Is the Ford Mondeo Hybrid a good car?

The Ford Mondeo Hybrid is a version of the big-selling Mondeo that you fill from a petrol pump but which has the back-up of a big battery, and it’s an alternative to cars such as the Volkswagen Passat GTE, Lexus IS 300h and smaller Toyota Prius.

At first glance, there’s not much difference between the hybrid and the petrol and diesel models, because the Mondeo Hybrid also comes in both saloon and estate body styles.

Inside, the only obvious difference is the redesigned instrument cluster. The speedometer now gets centre stage and, as in most hybrids, there is a readout to show you how much power you are either using or regenerating.

Otherwise, it’s pretty much standard Ford Mondeo inside this hybrid version. The centre console is dominated by a large infotainment touchscreen, which controls most of the functions, meaning relatively few buttons on the centre console and a neat, uncluttered layout. Sadly, the infotainment system isn’t as easy to use as the one you’ll find in a Passat GTE, but you won’t complain about the quality of materials that Ford has used inside.

You’ll also be very happy with the amount of room for passengers inside. The hybrid is every bit as spacious inside as any Mondeo and the driving position is excellent, with plenty of adjustment on the seat and steering wheel.

However, it’s a very different story when you look at the boot space. Whereas the standard Mondeo saloon and estate have very generous boots, the Hybrid versions have less room because the hybrid system’s batteries sit beneath the boot floor.

There are better hybrid cars and there are better Mondeos, which means this is hard to recommend

Mat Watson
carwow expert

Those batteries work with the 2.0-litre petrol engine to produce a combined 190hp, but the car isn’t as quick as that figure suggests it might be. Most similar cars use turbocharged engines, but the non-turbocharged unit in the Mondeo seems outgunned.

On paper, 0-62mph takes 9.2 seconds, but the more important figures are the CO2 emissions and fuel consumption – and they’re quite disappointing. The emissions are 98g/km, while the combined fuel economy of 50.4mpg isn’t much better than what you’ll get from a diesel-powered Mondeo. The Hybrid is further hampered by the fact that its fuel tank is smaller, down to 51 litres from the 62 litres offered by othrr Mondeos, which will doubtless reduce its range between fuel stops.

At least, the car swaps between the electric motors and petrol engine seamlessly, while the CVT automatic transmission is good when you’re gliding around smoothly. Most of the time, it’s also very quiet inside the Mondeo. However, when you floor it for maximum acceleration, the characteristic drone of an engine linked to this type of gearbox can be annoying.

The Ford Mondeo hybrid also isn’t quite as enjoyable to drive as other Mondeos, because it has low-rolling-resistance tyres. They do give a slight improvement in fuel consumption, but they also bring reduced grip. Even so, the Mondeo Hybrid is on a par with other hybrids and the suspension is more comfortable than in a Toyota Prius.

Like every Mondeo, the hybrid has a five-star safety rating from Euro NCAP. And, as it’s only available in some of the highest trim levels, it gets safety systems that are optional on lesser Mondeos such as lane-keep assist and traffic sign recognition.

In fact, it’s very well equipped overall. Trouble is, that doesn’t come cheap and, for much the same money, you can get the marginally more expensive to run, but better to drive and livelier 2.0-litre diesel version. Furthermore, a VW Passat GTE is bigger inside and better to drive.

Still, if you’re sold on the Mondeo, make sure you head to our deals pages to find the very best prices on one.

How practical is it?

Mondeo Hybrid is as roomy for people as any other Mondeo, but boot space takes a big hit.

Boot (seats up)
403 litres
Boot (seats down)
-

The Ford Mondeo Hybrid’s wheelbase (the length between the front and rear wheels) is the same as the conventionally fuelled car, so cabin space hasn’t changed a noticeable amount. That’s no bad thing though because cabin space has always been pretty generous in the Ford Mondeo. From a practical point of view, the driving position is excellent and there is plenty of adjustment for both the seat and the steering wheel.

Being the company car of choice for many drivers in the past, it’s no surprise that storage areas are pretty good in the Ford Mondeo. There are plenty of places for smaller stuff and there’s a handy tray behind the gear stick. There are two cup holders in the front and the door pockets in the back can carry a 500ml bottle.

The Ford Mondeo’s 383-litre boot is disappointing, because conventionally fuelled hatchback versions offer 541 litres, and getting to your stuff in the Hybrid’s boot is tricky because it’s an old-school four-door saloon, not a hatchback. Just as well there’s an Ford Mondeo Estate Hybrid version, too.

Still, at least the saloon’s boot opening is wide and low, allowing for larger items to be loaded, but loading will be hampered by the boot lip.

What's it like to drive?

The power figure looks decent, but the Hybrid feels quite pedestrian and doesn’t handle as well as other Mondeos.

The lithium-ion batteries and 2.0-litre petrol engine produce a combined 190hp.

On paper, 0-62mph takes 9.2 seconds, but the more important figures are the CO2 emissions and fuel consumption – and they’re quite disappointing. The emissions for the four-door version are 98g/km, while the combined fuel economy of 50.4mpg isn’t much better than what you’ll get from a diesel-powered Mondeo.

The Ford Mondeo Hybrid doesn’t feel particularly brisk, most likely because it has a naturally aspirated engine next to the turbocharged motors in rivals.

The car covers the 0-62mph in 9.2 seconds, which is “are we there yet” territory, but the more important figures are the CO2 emissions and fuel consumption. Which aren’t great. The emissions are 98g/km, while the combined fuel economy of 50.4mpg is about what a diesel-powered Mondeo will achieve.

At least, the car swaps between the electric motors and petrol engine seamlessly, while the CVT automatic transmission is good when you’re gliding around smoothly. Most of the time, it’s also very quiet inside the Mondeo. However, when you floor it for maximum acceleration, the characteristic drone of an engine linked to this type of gearbox can be annoying.

The Ford Mondeo hybrid also isn’t quite as enjoyable to drive as other Mondeos, because it sits on low-rolling-resistance tyres. They do give a slight improvement in fuel consumption, but they also bring reduced grip. Even so, the Mondeo Hybrid is on a par with other hybrids and the suspension is more comfortable than in a Toyota Prius.

What's it like inside?

Inside, the Hybrid is as a roomy and classy as any other Mondeo, but it isn’t particularly stylish.

Next Read full interior review
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